Kristel is writer and a fashion stylist from Athens, Greece. She recently relocated to Berlin, Germany and now lives between those two cities. She has worked for major Greek and international magazines, and runs Closet Liberation, her personal fashion project, that has grown to a collective of rebels and alternatives.

Baker’s Dozen: When a Hat is More than a Hat


Isabel Marant Baker Boy Hat can be found here.

The other day I was scrolling down my Instagram feed, full of Paris Fashion Week street style, when I noticed there was a hat revival going on.

Ladies’ hats dominated the scene on the street as well as the runway. We also saw berets in Dior‘s F/W 2018 show, and caps with veils, chapeaux, and black straw hats in Saint Laurent FW show.

It’s good news for Britain, where according to WWD, consumers dramatically curbed the consumption of accessories — including hats — last year, hurting companies like Accessorize and Claire’s.

While there is a French beret revival going on, the “Baker Boy” trend is even bigger right now. Originally a flat-cap, the baker boy (also referred to as newsboy, poor boy, or fisherman hat) has its origins to Italy and Britain. It’s a trend taken from the working “lower” classes of the 1910s and the 1920s.


Topshop Baker Boy Hat can be found here.

Who could have thought that the Peaky Blinders’ trademark back then, would excite women now? Truth be told, headwear is the spark to a monotonous outfit, the exclamation mark at the end of an emphasizing sentence. But the bigger trend nowadays is feminism and empowerment. In the same way that WWI changed women’s style — because women started doing jobs once done by men –nowadays women wear manly hats as a symbol of empowerment.

women wear manly hats as a symbol of empowerment

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With love,

FWO